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26 = Economy tasks based on weight of fuel used in flight

Proposal from

Andy Phillips - GBR

Proposal title

Economy tasks based on weight of fuel used in flight

Existing text

S10 Annex 3  

3.2.3  FUEL MEASUREMENT

Fuel will be measured by weight or volume but will be consistent for any given refuelling session. Refuelling will be in the order and in accordance with the instructions given at briefing. Failure of the aircraft to be present on time may result in penalty for the pilot.

Competitors must be able to demonstrate that their entire fuel system is empty.

New text

S10 Annex 3  

3.2.3  FUEL MEASUREMENT IN TASKS WITH A STANDARD FUEL QUANTITY

Fuel will be measured by weight or volume but will be consistent for any given refuelling session. Refuelling will be in the order and in accordance with the instructions given at briefing. Failure of the aircraft to be present on time may result in penalty for the pilot.

Competitors must be able to demonstrate that their entire fuel system is empty.

3.2.4 FUEL MEASUREMENT IN TASKS BASED ON WEIGHT OF FUEL USED IN FLIGHT

This is an alternative method of flying and scoring fuel economy tasks in the PF1 class by:

  • weighing the machine before and after the flight to measure the amount of fuel used in the task.
  • allowing pilots to carry as much fuel as they want, to ensure full task participation.
  • making pilots responsible that they adhere to the rules for risk of zero score.

For the purpose of scoring: One litre of fuel = 0.74kg = 740 grams

 

3.2.4.1 Weighing of machine before launch.

The weighing scale(s) must be capable of an accuracy of  +/-20g, and must be located next to the launch deck.

The machine should be weighed immediately before entering the launch deck.

The machine is only to be weighed with allowed items attached. It is each pilot’s responsibility to ensure that all other non-allowed items are removed prior to weighing.

The machine is photographed from all sides at the point of weighing.

After weighing, the machine is then moved onto the deck with a view to launching as soon as possible.

 

Marshals should ensure that pilots spend as little time as possible between the weighing and the launching, and may demand for a machine to be re-weighed if necessary. Any machine leaving the deck must re-weighed before re-entering.

 

3.2.4.2  Weighing of pilot and machine after landing.

As soon as a pilot lands back on the deck, a Marshal will direct the pilot to the scale for the machine to be weighed immediately.

The machine is only to be weighed with allowed items attached. It is each pilot’s responsibility to ensure that all other non-allowed items are removed prior to weighing.

The machine is then weighed and photographed once again from all sides.

 

Marshals should be vigilant, and check for non-allowed items that may be hidden or concealed on the machine. (Bulges in reserve containers, harness pockets etc)

If a machine is found to be weighed with a non-allowed item at the final weigh-in, then that pilot will score zero for that entire task.

Allowed Items:

  • Reserve parachute
  • Permanently fitted “Competition fuel bottle”
  • Permanently fitted lighting
  • Permanently-fitted gauges (such as fuel gauges, EGT, CHT, tachometer)

Non-allowed items:

  • Anything not in “Allowed items” including;
  • GPS loggers
  • Pilots own instruments (vario, compass etc)
  • Propeller covers
  • Helmets
  • Ear defenders
  • Goggles/sunglasses
  • Map boards/cases.

[Existing para 3.2.4 to be re-numbered as 3.2.5]

Reason

Current problems:

  • Emptying machines of all fuel is a tedious exercise that often wastes precious flying time.
  • An economy task cannot be set at short notice.
  • There is inconsistency in the way pilots are supervising each other's fuelling and to get away with keeping some fuel in pipes (or priming bulb) is not really seen as cheating.
  • Pilots have to modify their machines with complicated and potentially dangerous fuel systems and header tanks.
  •  Running out of fuel and landing out is a problem with retrieves taking yet more time.
  • Waste fuel is often discarded on the ground with the obvious environmental impacts.

The new proposal addresses all of these problems.


Added by Andy PHILLIPS Last edited by Robert HUGHES on 27 Sep, 2012 08:11. Quick links: http://wiki.fai.org/x/SQLk or 26 = Economy tasks based on weight of fuel used in flight
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